How To Soak Brown Rice

I suppose the first question I should answer before “How should I soak my rice?” is “Why should I soak my rice?”

Rice, as many grains do, contains phytic acid, which blocks mineral absorption. Soaking allows the phytase present in the grains to break down the phytic acid and make the grain overall more digestible and the nutrients more accessible to the body. Because rice doesn’t contain as much phytase as other common grains, the best effect is from reusing the soaking water repeatedly to allow the phytase to build up to useful levels in the soaking water. (I’ll explain this whole technique later in the post.)

There’s a lot of debate over how important it is to soak your grains. Some are even opposed to soaking grains because (apparently) higher phytic acid levels may be associated with a reduced risk of cancer. In my opinion this just comes back to a variety of food in  your diet being important. If you eat some grains soaked you’ll get the maximum nutrient absorption, and if you skip soaking some of the time for convenience, well, I guess  you may be fighting cancer at the same time.

I think there are two groups of people for who soaking grains is more important on the nutritional priority list.

First, those who eat a lot grains in their diets. If you’re eating a vegetarian diet, for example, or are stretching out all your meals with a lot of grains because of a low food budget, you really want to make sure you’re getting maximum nutrition from those grains. You also don’t want to to risk all that phytic acid blocking the nutrients from all the other foods you eat as well. In fact, with a large grain consumption,  you may even want to move beyond soaking, and try sprouting or fermenting to get even more nutrition from your grains.

Second, those with food allergies (even not grain related), other digestive problems, and general chronic health problems. If you have food allergies, it’s very likely that you have leaky gut, and your gut will have more chances to heal the easier it is for it to digest the food you give it. Similarly, if you have any kind of chronic health problems, you want to be providing as much nutrition to your body as you can, without making it work any harder to get that nutrition than is absolutely necessary. It may even be helpful to give your body a break from grains entirely for a while as it heals, but if that’s not practical for some reason, make sure you’re soaking (and again, maybe even sprouting or fermenting) the grains you do eat.

On the other hand, if you have a diet full of lots of veggies, animal fats and proteins and some grains, and you’re relatively healthy, you may not see as much problem with eating some of your grains unsoaked. (Eating vitamin C with your grains does seems to significantly mitigate the ill effects of the phytic acid, so all those fruits and veggies in your diet will help a lot.) Life is busy. Set your priorities where they really matter, and don’t get bullied into making that include soaking  your grains unless you really want it to.

Now that that’s out of the way, for those of you who are interested in taking a little extra time to extract the maximum nutrition from your food, may I present my method of soaking rice. ( I use double this recipe in the video. The amounts listed below provide two meals worth of cooked rice for my husband and I, plus one meals worth for the freezer.)

Healthiness Rating: Healthy

I know the Paleo types will disagree, but in my book soaked grains are healthy, provided you’re getting a proper range of nutrition in your diet overall.

Yumminess Rating: Yummy

This post is a little different from my normal recipes, in that it’s more a  base technique than a full blown recipe. However, I think it still deserves a Yummy rating, because my husband normally prefers white rice to brown rice, but he doesn’t mind the brown rice when I soak it like this. That means getting more nutrients into a meal without having to use ‘I’m eating this because it’s healthy, but I don’t like it’ points.

Soaked Rice

2 cups of brown rice

1/4 cup apple cider vinegar, lemon juice or yogurt whey

4 cups of filtered water

Put all ingredients in a bowl and soak overnight or for at least 7 hours. Strain soaking water out of rice and save in a jar for next time. Rinse the rice and cook as desired, or following the recipe below.

Next time you want to soak rice, take your soaking water out of the fridge. Add water if needed until you have liquid equal to twice as much rice as you want to soak. Pour the soaking liquid over rice and, as before, soak overnight or for at least 7 hours.

The more times you reuse the soaking water the fluffier and more digestible your rice will be.

Brown Rice

2 cups of rice, soaked

4 cups of water

1 tsp salt

1 TBSP butter

Put all ingredients in medium saucepan. Cover and cook over medium heat for 30-45 minutes. (Officially brown rice takes 45 minutes to cook, but I find that soaked brown rice usually cooks faster than I expect it to, sometimes in closer to 30 minutes.)

6 comments

  1. […] that the whole wheat flour in this recipe doesn’t get soaked, see my comments on phytic acid here. This would be one of those cases where I think it’s better to enjoy a moderately healthy […]

  2. […] 1/2 cups of dry brown rice (I recommend soaking it the night […]

  3. […] mill your own non-sprouted flour for pennies) or with the phytic acid from the unsoaked flour (see this post for a full discussion of my thoughts on phytic acid and soaking grains), so I found the perfect […]

  4. […] special sushi variety, but it MUST be short grain to stick together properly. (I use brown rice, soaked overnight to improve the texture and flavor.) The rice is cooked with vinegar, salt and sweetener for proper […]

  5. […] So, if you’re very concerned about the effects of phytic acid (I’ve discussed before when you might need to be concerned) skip eating oats entirely, or add a teaspon of rye flour (which is high in phytase) when you soak […]

  6. […] A couple of caveats to the rating of healthy: 1, the healthiness of the onion ring depends on lot on what you fry it in. Choose the healthiest oil you have access to. I would rank lard and tallow as the best frying oils, closely followed by coconut oil, followed by ghee if your frying temperature isn’t too high. If none of those are option you can use a neutral oil such as grapeseed, safflower or rice bran, but stay away from soy oil, corn oil and hydrogenated oils like Crisco if you possibly can. 2, the whole wheat flour is unsoaked in this recipe, leaving a high phytic acid content. I think this is fine for most people, especially for occasional use, but if you have digestive issues or chronic health problems you may want to stay away from unsoaked whole wheat. (For a more full discussion of my opionions on phytic acid, see this post.) […]

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